What's New

Deciphering 2018 IECC—Daylight Responsive Controls

One area that hasn’t changed much with the 2018 IECC revision are the sections specifying how daylight harvesting should work in a compliant facility. That’s because Section C405.2.3, Daylight Responsive Controls, was initially added during the 2015 IECC revision, which revolutionized the technologies and techniques required by the energy standard. Read more...

What's New

Deciphering 2018 IECC—Light Reduction Controls

In the IECC standard, two techniques work together to reduce energy usage in most indoor commercial spaces: Interior Manual Lighting Controls (referring to manual control capabilities) and Light Reduction Controls (specifying that those manual controls must be capable of dimming and/or multi-level switching). Read more...

What's New

Deciphering 2018 IECC—Automatic Time Switch Control

Automatic Time Switch Controls have been a mainstay in IECC standards. The 2018 IECC revision makes a few additional clarifications to the time switch control language, but the message and methods largely stay the same from the 2015 version. Read more...

What's New

Deciphering 2018 IECC—Occupancy Sensors and Open Office Requirements

Occupancy sensors are energy code standbys, and with the revision of IECC for 2018, they are now required in more spaces. Break rooms, enclosed offices, open plan office areas, and warehouse storage areas have now been added to the required applications list. In addition, the occupancy sensor auto-OFF time has been reduced from 2015’s 30 minutes to 20 minutes in 2018. Read more...

Energy Saving

Value of Energy Data for Building Owners

Commercial and industrial buildings in the United States consume a tremendous amount of electrical energy each year. Approximately 30% of all energy consumed by these buildings and facilities is wasted equating to $120 billion in waste. Read more...

What's New

Importance of Emergency Lighting Controls

Building codes across the country require emergency lighting controls in nonresidential buildings to keep occupants safe during a utility outage, fire or power failure. Emergency lighting illuminates pathways out of a building and facilitates the evacuation of a building to reduce the panic and stress of the building’s occupants. Read more...

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